Common Myths About Pasco County Car Accidents

In 2015, there were 374,003 vehicle accidents[1] in the state of Florida causing 243,229 injuries.  While there may be just as many myths about accidents as accidents themselves, the most common myths include:

  • MYTH: You don’t need to pull over, exchange information or file a police report if you are involved in a minor accident.

The truth is that failing to pull over[2] or file a police report could actually get you into a considerable amount of legal trouble. Under Florida law, you are required to pull over your vehicle at the scene of an accident, even if the accident does not result in any injuries and even if the damage appears to be minimal. Failure to do so could result in misdemeanor charges.

If you are involved in an auto accident in New Port Richey, follow these tips:

  1. Pull over immediately and check for injuries.
  2. Call the police if there are any injuries or extensive damage, one of the other drivers attempts to leave the scene or you suspect other drivers involved are intoxicated.
  3. Take note of the time, date, and location of the accident and any circumstances that may have caused or contributed to the accident.
  4. Get the contact information for any witnesses at the scene.
  5. Exchange your vehicle and insurance information with other drivers at the scene.
  6. Get the medical care you need and notify your insurance company within 24 hours of the accident occurring.
  • MYTH: Minor accidents don’t cause serious injuries.

Medical care should always be sought after a car accident. This is because seemingly minor injuries such as soreness, bruising or swelling could be indicative of a more serious condition that threatens your overall health and possibly could result in serious financial costs.  According to the Centers for Disease Control[3] and Prevention, medical costs associated with car accident injuries can run into tens of thousands of dollars, and these costs may continue to accrue for as long as 18 months after your accident.

  • MYTH: Claiming whiplash or back injuries is simply a way of trying to get money from the insurance company.

According to the Mayo Clinic[4], whiplash is a neck injury that occurs as the result of sudden, forceful back-and-forth movement of the neck. Whiplash is common in car accidents and is nothing to take lightly as it could result in neck sprains as well as potentially serious head injuries. Back pain and injuries are also common in the aftermath of car crashes. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, back pain may be indicative of strained muscles or problems with the disks that make up the spine.

These injuries require proper medical care, may take months to recover from and can result in lingering and even permanent disability.

  • MYTH: The settlement offer that your insurance company makes is the maximum amount your claim is worth.

While many people think the insurance company is on their side when it comes to settling car accident claims, this is not entirely true. Insurance companies are in the business to make money. One of the easiest ways to do this is by undervaluing or denying car accident claims. For instance, an insurance company claims representative may diminish the true value of replacing your vehicle as well as the ongoing costs that may be associated with your injuries.

Contact a New Port Richey Auto Accident Attorney

If you are involved in a car collision, it is important to speak to an experienced auto accident attorney to obtain facts, not myths, about your case.  Don’t listen to family members or co-workers who, although they may mean well, do not understand the specifics of Florida law concerning auto collision accidents or the best way to negotiate a settlement with the insurance company.  The attorneys at the Dolman Law Group are ready to speak with you today for a free consultation.  Call our office at (727) 853-6275.

Dolman Law Group
5435 Main Street
New Port Richey, FL 34652
(727) 853-6275

https://www.dolmanlaw.com/new-port-richey-auto-accident-attorney/

References:

[1] https://firesportal.com/Pages/Public/QuickStats.aspx
[2] http://www.cdc.gov
[3] http://www.cdc.gov
[4] http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/whiplash/basics/definition/con-20033090

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